Tag Archives: personal story

Coming Clean About My IBD Mistakes

Coming Clean About My IBD Mistakes

I’ve made many mistakes along my disease journey. The first, and most dangerous, was to believe that my fate was already sealed.
This post was sponsored by AbbVie Inc. Personal opinions and thoughts are my own.

Crohn’s and Colitis Awareness Week is December 1-7. If you have Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, get tips from gastroenterologist Dr. Corey Siegel, a Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis expert, by visiting the online Expert Advice Tool before your next trip to the doctor’s office.

When I was 16, I was diagnosed with a disease I’d never heard of called ulcerative colitis. Approximately 700,000 people in the United States are affected by ulcerative colitis – a chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) characterized by inflammation of the large intestine (colon and rectum). It is not caused by food or a contagious disease. 

Those are the facts. Now, for the reality. Continue reading

It's Important to Share Your Stories

About IBD Podcast 33 – It’s Important to Share Your Stories

Why is it important to tell our stories? Every person who has IBD is unique and so is their disease journey. You might not think your experience is relevant to others living with IBD or another chronic condition, but it is, in many ways. A story can provide validation and hope while helping put the reality of life with IBD in perspective. Brooke Abbott of The Crazy Creole Mommy Chronicles and IBD Moms and I continue our discussion of how we can support others with IBD through telling our stories and listening to yours.

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World IBD Day Isn't For You

Why World IBD Day Isn’t For You

If you have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), or you love someone who does, you don’t need an awareness day to tell you the impact it has on your daily life. People living with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis and their caregivers already have a vast education on IBD that can only be gained through experience. World IBD Day isn’t really for you.

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You Get Tired With Shawntel Bethea and Brooke Abbott

Episode 21 – You Get Tired With Shawntel Bethea and Brooke Abbott

The healthcare space isn’t a level playing field. Minority populations face complex challenges when it comes to accessing and receiving care, which is why April is designated as National Minority Health Month. In regards to inflammatory bowel disease, it’s not well known that Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis also affect minorities. Shawntel Bethea of Chronically Strong and Brooke Abbott of The Crazy Creole Mommy Chronicles discuss how they’ve been affected by healthcare disparity and offer concrete ideas on what can be done to start addressing healthcare gaps in their communities.

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Episode 20 – This Is Just the Beginning with Michael Tresca

Take a journey back to 1999, when cellphones were a rarity, dial-up internet access was still in use, and Amber had her first surgery of the 2-step j-pouch process. Amber’s husband Mike, a writer and communicator, journaled his thoughts on the day of the surgery. This journal was recently uncovered and Amber reads it to Mike and gets his reactions and further recollections of that challenging day.

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When Your Body Image is Crap

Amber Prom

This is what prednisone did to me prior to my senior prom. It hurt to smile, my cheeks were so big.

Many people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) will admit to having a body image issue. The  research shows that people with IBD who have a healthy self-image are in the minority. And after all, how could we not have issues with our bodies? Our bodies fail us without warning, not to mention the symptoms of IBD which are often so distressing and personally upsetting to oneself and to others.

It’s funny, now as an “over 40,” I think back on the days when I was younger and I have to laugh at my skewed sense of self. The facts that support my internal monologue on body image will surely upset those who were closest to me when I was a child and a teen. We didn’t discuss things like body image in the 70s and 80s and there wasn’t anyone who told me the things I tell my daughter, that her body is strong and beautiful and that we will do our best to take care of it.

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What Can’t You Do?

Monsters are real

Recently, during an interview, I was asked to talk about what I couldn’t do because of my IBD or my j-pouch. I may have visibly bristled at the question, though I tried to mask this initial negative reaction. I did think about how to formulate an answer–probably for a good solid minute. In the end, I couldn’t come up with anything.

The interviewer made a few suggestions, but they were things that I don’t dwell on, such as dietary restrictions. Having some dietary restrictions is not something I think about often. I can absolutely still eat all kinds of healthy food as well as not so healthy, yet tasty, food like chocolate, and also have a cocktail. I no longer see food as an obstacle or a problem, because I’ve worked out my diet and I pretty much stick with what I know at this point. Therefore, this is not something I ruminate about or concern myself with too much.

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About IBD Podcast 8 – Michael Tresca, Amber’s Husband

What’s it like to watch your partner’s ulcerative colitis become life-threatening and not be able to do anything about it? My husband, Mike, tells my story from his perspective, including how we met, what it was like to watch my health degrade, and all about our fairy tale wedding.

Featured Guest:

Michael Tresca

Want to become a Lady or Lord of Glencoe, like Amber? Buy your plot of land here: https://www.highlandtitles.com

No, there are no utensils at Medieval Times. But you can get married there, like we did, or have your 15th anniversary party there, which we also did: http://www.medievaltimes.com

In loving memory of Anastasia, also known as Mary Queen of Scots and the Quiet Scottish Tailor.

Intro Music: Sunny – Bensound.com – www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music
Outro Music: Tenderness – Bensound.com – www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music

 

My High School Teachers and My IBD

My High School Teachers And My IBD

Amber And Her Father

Graduation day! That’s me and my dad, who passed away in 1998. Helloooo prednisone moon face on me.

After my first colonoscopy and my diagnosis of ulcerative colitis, I spent about 40 days in the hospital. I was a junior in high school, so that whole situation had to be dealt with. Thankfully I was a good student, and when it was time to deal with homework and missing class, I was able to cope with much of it.

I had great teachers in high school — for the most part. Continue reading

A Diagnosis: Yay.

My first colonoscopy took place at the hospital, so immediately after it was over, I was taken upstairs and admitted. Now, I’d never been sick in my life: being treated with antibiotics for a rash a few months earlier and chickenpox when I was 12 were the only other two times that I received medical care. This, of course, was on a completely different scale. I was taken upstairs to the pediatrics ward.

CCFA Book

The first — and only — book available to me when I was diagnosed at the age of 16. It was small, short, and didn’t contain much current information.

Here’s the thing about being in peds as a teen: you’re not a small child, so much of what goes on there doesn’t help you. The staff is used to dealing with common childhood illnesses, and while IBD is not rare, I’d venture to say they didn’t see it very often. In the small community hospital where I was treated, I actually saw very few other children. Once a classmate was admitted for appendicitis and an appendectomy. She, of course, left after a few days. Other than that, I saw mostly young adults in the pediatrics ward. Maybe our community just had healthy kids, or kids who needed specialized care went into Detroit for Henry Ford, or down to Ann Arbor for the University of Michigan.

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